Raspberry tomato: cultivation & care

Regina
Regina
Regina
Regina

I studied horticultural sciences at university and in my free time you can find me in my own patch of land, growing anything with roots. I am particularly passionate about self-sufficiency and seasonal food.

Favourite fruit: quince, cornelian cherry and blueberries
Favourite vegetables: peas, tomatoes and garlic

The ‘Raspberry’ tomato is a unique, pink beefsteak tomato. In the following article, find out how to plant the ‘Raspberry’ oxheart tomato variety in your garden and how to care for it properly.

Raspberry tomato plant bearing fruit
The ‘Raspberry’ tomato is a type of beefsteak tomato [Photo: Swetlana Wall/ Shutterstock.com]

The ‘Raspberry’ oxheart tomato has an enticingly full flavour, delicate pink colour and high yield. We will introduce you to this tomato enthusiast’s variety and give tips on growing and harvesting it.

‘Raspberry’ tomato variety: profile

FruitBeef tomato, pink
FlavourJuicy, tangy, fruity
Ripening timeEarly
GrowthIndeterminate, up to 160 cm in height
LocationGreenhouse, outdoors (with shelter from rain)

Origin and history of the ‘Raspberry’ tomato plant

The ‘Raspberry’ heirloom tomato variety originates from Poland. It is a heritage variety that has been preserved through generations of tomato enthusiasts and hobby gardeners.

Description and taste

The large fruits of the ‘Raspberry’ tomato reach a weight of up to 500 g while the plants grow to a height of about 160 cm. The plump, slightly ribbed pink fruits ripen from mid-July in clusters of roughly three tomatoes. Healthy ‘Raspberry’ tomato plant cultivation leads to high yields of fruits with very thin skin and juicy flesh. With its tangy, fruity, and aromatic taste, it is considered a gourmet tomato. Being an heirloom (seed-saving) variety, you can save the tomato seeds yourself for the cultivation of next year’s plants.

pink, ripe big raspberry tomato fruit
When ripe, the ‘Raspberry’ turns soft pink [Photo: Fixazh/ Shutterstock.com]

‘Raspberry’ tomato plant: growing and care

Greenhouse tomato cultivation suits the ‘Raspberry’ variety well, but it can also be grown outdoors, provided there is shelter from rain. This is because the fruits burst easily when it rains, and the plants are susceptible to late blight (Phytophthora infestans). On the other hand, this variety does not mind cold temperatures; even in cool summers it produces a good yield. Plant the ‘Raspberry’ oxheart tomato in the greenhouse from the beginning of May. However, wait until at least the middle of May for growing outside, and make sure to harden off the young plants for 1 to 2 weeks before moving them outside permanently. To improve the soil in the bed and in the greenhouse, dig and fill a hole with a specially adapted compost, like our Plantura Organic Tomato & Vegetable Compost, before placing the young plants in it. The compost promotes microorganisms and improves the soil structure in the bed in the long term. The nutrients in this compost nourish the tomato plants in the first weeks after planting and support healthy growth and abundant flowering. After planting, water the tomato plant generously.

Plantura Organic Vegetable Compost
Plantura Organic Vegetable Compost

Peat-free & environmentally-friendly: for tomatoes & all other vegetables, ensures a rich & aromatic harvest, child & pet friendly

As a short bush plant, the ‘Raspberry’ tomato grows very well with two shoots. To do this, leave one low side shoot and carefully remove all other shoots. Repeat tomato plant pruning roughly every fortnight, so that the plant does not waste resources on the growth of the side shoots instead of the fruit. Fertilise from June onwards with a slow-release fertiliser, like our Plantura Tomato Food. The plant-based granulate is absorbed into the soil surface around the plants and is then slowly and evenly broken down by the soil organisms to release its nutrients for the tomato roots.

Plantura Tomato Food
Plantura Tomato Food

With a long-lasting effect, for healthy soil, child & pet friendly

Harvesting and using ‘Raspberry’ tomatoes

As soon as the ‘Raspberry’ tomato starts to turn pink, it is ready for harvesting. You can harvest the tasty beef tomato until the first frost. It is best eaten fresh, in salads, sandwiches, or simply as a snack. Of course, they can also be cooked, but their aromatic flavour is best enjoyed raw.

Are you familiar with the unusual green tomato varieties? We love them for their fruity-fresh taste and their light and dark shades of green that add variety to the nightshade family.

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